Arizona Criminal Defense Attorney Blog

5th Amendment: Right to Remain Silent

550-0038-0409-0105-2144.jpg45 years after Miranda v. Arizona – Its impact on the US Criminal Justice System
Over the last 45 years, legal controversies and challenges have continued to plague the “Miranda Rights”. Yet still it is recognized by all states in country. Following an arrest, the police must inform or warn a person of their “right to remain silent” and their right to defense counsel.

In Arizona the right to remain silent is afforded by both the United States Constitution and the Arizona Constitution. The right to remain silent is a privilege, because it enables a person to a avoid self-incrimination.
Under the Fifth Amendment of the US Constitution a person shall not be compelled to be witness against themselves in their criminal case. When you hear someone say they are “pleading the 5th”, this is usually what they are referring to.

Article 2, Section 10 of the Arizona Constitution states that no person shall be compelled to testify or provide testimony, or statements against their own defense.
The right to avoid self-incrimination existed long before the landmark case. But since the US Supreme Court ruling in favor or Ernesto Miranda, in Miranda v. Arizona in 1966 they have been referred to as “Miranda Rights or “Miranda Warning”. In this case, the defendant Ernesto Miranda made a confession, which led to a conviction based on his statements. Ernesto Miranda appealed the decision and prevailed in the US Supreme Court. His argument was that he had not been made aware of his right to remain silent during interrogation, or criminal defense attorney.

If a person is arrested for a DUI or crime, it is important that they invoke their rights. After an arrest and before any interrogation the police must read a suspect their Miranda Rights. Invoking one’s right to remain silent helps avoiding self-incriminating statements that can later be used against them.
To invoke the right to remain silent one must verbally or in writing put police on notice that they wish to do so. If a person simply remains silent, they will be perceived by police as being uncooperative. It’s also important for a suspect to answer routine questions regarding identity and residency as well as the booking process.

Criminal Rights Attorney Chandler AZ

If you have been arrested, be sure you invoke your right to remain silent regarding the charges, until your defense attorney can be present, or has given you other instructions. If your rights have been violated, it may lead to dismissal of charges, other challenges or defenses in your case. You should always consult a criminal defense attorney if you face active charges to discuss your matter, and options for defense.

Additional Resource Links:

Arizona State Legislature – AZ Constitution

Miranda Rights Q. and A.

Justia Law Summary: Miranda v. Arizona 1966

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Law Office of James Novak
4500 S. Lakeshore Drive
Tempe AZ 85282
(480) 413-1499
www.Arizonacriminaldefenselawyer.com
www.novakazlaw.com